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IDS Project Conference 2015 Agenda

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Wednesday, July 29th, 2015

Time Session & Room
8:00am - 6:00pm Conference Registration (Adirondack Mountain)
3:00pm - Ongoing Room Registration (Hotel)
9:00am - 12:00pm Pre-Conference: Modifying ILLiad Webpages (1812/Climb to Glory)
10:00am - 12:00pm All Region User Group (Morning Session) (Adirondack/Thousand Islands)
12:00pm - 1:00pm Lunch (Ontario/Adirondack/Thousand Islands)
1:00pm - 4:00pm Pre-Conference: ILLiad Client Addon Creation Session (1812/Climb to Glory)
1:00pm - 4:00pm All Region User Group (Afternoon Session) (Adirondack/Thousand Islands)
6:00pm - 8:00pm Cocktails & Dinner / Meet & Greet (Outdoor Gazebo/Ontario/Adirondack/Thousand Islands)


Thursday, July 30th, 2015

Time Resource Sharing
(Ontario Room)
Information Technology
(Adirondack Room)
Acquisitions / Collection Development
(Thousand Islands Room)
Administration
(1812 Room)
Ongoing Room Registration (Hotel)
7:30am - 8:30am Breakfast (Ontario/Adirondack/Thousand Islands)
8:00am - 12:00pm Conference Registration (Adirondack Mountain)
9:00am - 9:15am Opening Session (Ontario/Adirondack/Thousand Islands)
9:15am - 10:15am Keynote: Lars Leon, University of Kansas Libraries (Ontario/Adirondack/Thousand Islands)
10:15am - 10:30am Break
10:30am - 11:20am Tracking Lost Book Invoices Using Billing Manager
(Jami Beserock)
Introduction to Workflow Optimization through IDS Logic
(Shannon Pritting)
Empire Shared Collections
(Nicole Colello,
Jennifer Murray)
IDS Project Update
11:30am - 12:20pm Ship it to Me!: Evaluating Interlibrary Loan Services for Distance Students
(Kourtney Blackburn, Alicia Marrese)
Step Right Up! See the Marvelous and Fabulous ILLiad 8.6!
(Kerry Keegan, Caitlin Hafen)
Using ILL Data to Make Important Collection Development Decisions
(Brandon Lewter)
A Case Study: The Value of IDS Project
12:20pm - 1:50pm Lunch (American Grill/Pavilion)
1:50pm - 2:40pm International Copyright, Interlibrary Loan, and CRMS-World
(Jennifer Block)
Occam’s Reader
(Kenny Ketner)
Doc DELlionaires: Increasing Faculty Participation in ILL and Document Delivery Services
(Kristin Walker)
The Future of IDS Project
2:50pm - 3:40pm Interviewing, Hiring, and Training Student Employees
(Ben Hogben)
Adding and Modifying Document Request Forms
(Jason Kibby & Chris White)
Visualizing Library Data
(Nicolle Colello, Jennifer Murray)
Administration Roundtables
3:40pm - 3:55pm Break (Ontario/Adirondack/Thousand Islands)
3:55pm - 4:45pm Yes, I Use Get It Now. Should You?
(Karen Melanson, Ben Hogben, Anne Bouvier)
ILLiad Addons Discussion Group
(Bill Jones & Logan Rath)
GIST GDM Online
(Mark Sullivan)
Learn more about recent EBSCO Discovery updates and Plum Analytics' new data visualization component
(Nancy Grimaldi and Jim Kropelin)
4:45pm - 6:30pm Vendor Fair – Wine & Cheese Social (Pavilion)
6:30pm - 8:00pm Cocktails & Dinner (Ontario/Adirondack/Thousand Islands)
8:00pm - 11:00pm Conference Celebration and Awards Ceremony (Outdoor Gazebo/Ontario/Adirondack/Thousand Islands)


Friday, July 31st, 2015

Time Resource Sharing
(Ontario Room)
Information Technology
(Adirondack Room)
Acquisitions / Collection Development
(Thousand Islands Room)
7:30pm - 8:15pm Breakfast (Ontario/Adirondack/Thousand Islands)
Up until 12:00pm Room Checkout (Hotel)
8:15am - 9:00am NY3Rs & I2NY Update (Kathy Miller & John Hammond) (Ontario/Adirondack/Thousand Islands)
9:00am - 9:50am Atlas Update (Ontario/Adirondack/Thousand Islands)
10:00am - 10:50am Using ILL Data and Statistics: The Power to Help You Rule Your ILL World
(Tony Melvyn)
Lightning Talks (New Staff Development) ILL as a Resource and How a Pilot Project Changed an Access Services Department
(Marta Ambroziak, Sarah Hughes)
10:50am - 11:00am Break
11:00am - 11:50am "Disrupting" ILL Services In a Good Way
(Beth Posner, Silvia Cho, Phillip Mui)
IDS Logic: Development Update
(Bill Jones & Mike Mulligan)
Stumped? Let's Jump!: Getting Over Tricky Borrowing Requests
(Sarah Shank)
12:00pm - 12:50pm ILL: The Uber Patron - Best Practices for Increasing Interdepartmental Problem Solving
(Cen Cheng)
IDS Logic: Help Us Help You
(Bill Jones & Mike Mulligan)
Interlibrary Loan Assessment
(Jennifer Acker)
1:00pm - 2:30pm Lunch, New Member Awards, Announcements, Raffle, & Closing Remarks
(Ontario/Adirondack/Thousand Islands)



Thursday, July 30th, 2015

Thursday, 10:30am - 11:20am

  • Tracking Lost Book Invoices Using Billing Manager (Jami Beserock)
    • Any ILLiad user in a high volume ILL office spends a large portion of their workday within the client processing and managing requests, performing repetitive actions day in and day out. This presentation will demonstrate how to use the IDS-recommended program "AutoHotKey" to easily create custom keyboard and mouse shortcuts for ILLiad. Shortcuts, personally tailored to your own tastes, have the potential to cut processing times and automate common tasks. Tasks that require several clicks of the mouse can be simplified to the push of a single keyboard button, or a common keyboard command can be moved to the mouse for instant access. We spend far too much time using ILLiad to not be "power users," getting the most we can out of the program.

  • Introduction to Workflow Optimization through IDS Logic(Shannon Pritting)
    • Server addons are powerful, but until now have been limited to using the information in your ILLiad database. This presentation will show how a 56 line server addon can leverage the IDS Logic Service to integrate information from library catalogs, OCLC web services, and other data sources to facilitate workflow automation and improve patron service. The presentation will also explore possibilities for workflow automation using transaction information, advanced search criteria, and custom flagging, and how this can be achieved without touching addon code. Staff interaction through custom flags and queues will be discussed, and case studies from 50 diverse libraries will demonstrate the many applications discovered to date.

  • Empire Shared Collections (Nicole Colello)
    • In the current library environment, academic and public libraries tend to work independently from each other when making collection management decisions such as retention, storage, and preservation. The Empire Shared Collection Program promotes the cost-effective management and preservation of low-use print legacy collections by storing the shared collection in a high-density, central location. By providing prompt document delivery of the collection, the program supports ready and perpetual access to all member library users. In this session I will discuss the tools, standards, services, costs and policies that are needed to create and sustain a collaborative print repository. Questions such as who makes the decisions, who owns the materials, how membership costs are developed, how records for the collection are discovered, and how access to the collection is provided will be answered. I will discuss the future phases of the program such as a shared "last copy" monograph collection, a distributed model of serials that support core curriculum, and opportunities to collaborate on other shared services.

  • IDS Project Update
    • Description forthcoming.

Thursday, 11:30am - 12:20pm

  • Ship it to Me!: Evaluating Interlibrary Loan Services for Distance Students (Kourtney Blackburn, Alicia Marrese)
    • Starting in Fall 2013, St. John Fisher College's Lavery Library began providing Interlibrary Loan services to doctoral students at its two recently established satellite campuses, the College of New Rochelle (CNR) and Onondaga Community College (OCC). Although students from both campuses received loans at their homes through UPS delivery, the campus' locations originally resulted in two different return procedures: patrons affiliated with CNR returned items through UPS, while an OCC staff member collected return items and drove them back to our library. Although this model worked well at the beginning, an increase in requests and differences in procedure resulted in confusion among patrons and staff relating to communication, extremely overdue materials, and renewal policies. After one academic year, our library reassessed our procedures and policies to improve internal workflows, better serve our patrons, and align with ILL best practices. Knowing that consistency and excellent communication with patrons is vital to a successful resource sharing program, we began by streamlining procedures for both campuses to utilize UPS return shipping. We also changed internal workflows, retooled overdue notices and policies, and became more proactive in educating distance patrons about the policies and benefits of using ILL. Since incorporating these changes and increasing succinct communication, distance students have been more responsive and mindful of our relationship with other resource sharing libraries, and feedback has been very positive. In the upcoming year, we are implementing the more cost-effective UPS CampusShip into our workflow, expanding ILL to include distance faculty, and continuing to look for ways to better serve the needs of our patrons.

  • Step Right Up! See the Marvelous and Fabulous ILLiad 8.6! (Kerry Keegan, Caitlin Hafen)
    • Come one, come all and see the wondrous and exciting new ILLiad 8.6! The latest and greatest features will be explained and demonstrated, illuminating the electrifying arrival of Atlas System's latest attraction. Prepare to gasp in astonishment at the strength of the "Electronic Delivery Utility" and cheer with glee while blocked users are magically restored to full borrowing potential! Text messaging, web aliases, and borrowing resubmissions will thrill and delight. Don't be too slow and miss the big show!

  • Using ILL Data to Make Important Collection Development Decisions (Brandon Lewter)
    • Depending on the type of library, much of its budget is allocated for collection development. Why would it be any different? Most libraries, especially at academic institutions, are there to provide its users with academic materials to further their education. In conjunction with providing these academic materials, when making collection development decisions, academic libraries must also take in to consideration accreditation standards. According to section 2.9 of the Resource Manual for the Principles of Accreditation: Foundations for Quality Enhancement, written by SACSCOC, academic libraries must follow these guidelines when it comes to their collection: The institution, through ownership or formal arrangements or agreements, provides and supports student and faculty access and user privileges to adequate library collections and services and to other learning/information resources consistent with the degrees offered. Collections, resources, and services are sufficient to support all its educational, research, and public service programs. (Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges, 2012) As the Interlibrary Loan Coordinator for College of Charleston Libraries, I play an integral role on the Collection Development Committee. Data I harvest from interlibrary loan statistics is used by the Collection Development Committee to make important acquisition decisions in various ways. My presentation will discuss the ways interlibrary loan data is used in collection development decision making, what data is important and how to present it, specific examples of how I gather said data, using ILLiad software and components, and specific examples of decisions we have made at the College of Charleston using it. Reference Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges. (2012, February 14). Resource Manual for the Principles of Accreditation: Foundations for Quality Enhancement. Retrieved April Tuesday, 2015, from Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Comission on Colleges: https://www.sacscoc.org/pdf/Resource%20Manual.pdf

  • A Case Study: The Value of IDS Project
    • Description forthcoming.

Thursday, 1:50pm - 2:40pm

  • International Copyright, Interlibrary Loan, and CRMS-World (Jennifer Block)
    • Obtaining copies of older materials neither published nor available in the United States can be both challenging and confusing due to copyright law. In the United States an older item's copyright status is determined by publication date. That is not true elsewhere. For the past several years, the University of Michigan's Copyright Office has managed an IMLS (Institute for Museum and Library Studies Grant) Leadership Grant, CRMS-World. Reviewers are investigating the copyright status of approximately 180,000 items in HathiTrust published between 1870-1965 in the United Kingdom, Canada, and Australia. In those countries the copyright terms have always been determined by the death dates of the authors. Those works that are determined to be in the public domain will become fully available in HathiTrust. This presentation will first provide an overview of this grant then specifically discuss copyright law in the United Kingdom, Canada, and Australia in relationship to resource sharing. The goal is provide practitioners with an increased knowledge of copyright in these countries and resources that can be consulted to locate death dates of authors and other contributors so that a determination can be made whether a obtaining a copy of an entire work is possible from a library in the country of publication. The role of other credited material (such as illustrations, prefaces, introductions), crown copyright, and GATT Restoration will also be discussed.

  • Occam’s Reader (Kenny Ketner)
    • Occam's Reader is a software program that allows interlibrary loan of electronic books. Occam's Reader is a collaboration between Texas Tech University, the University of Hawaii at Manoa and the Greater Western Library Alliance. Currently Occam's Reader works with the ILLiad software to allow document delivery staff to lend electronic books seamlessly between libraries. We are currently working with .PDF documents only, but we have plans to support other formats of electronic books and to develop a stand-alone, web-based version of the system. If you are interested in learning more about Occam's Reader, or if you would like the creators to present our idea, you can contact us here.

  • Doc DELlionaires: Increasing Faculty Participation in ILL and Document Delivery Services (Kristin Walker)
    • Using data from UT Austin that shows the increase in faculty participation in new and existing library services as a result of launching an on-campus document delivery service. The data includes the increase in new user registrations, chapter and article request increases as well as feedback from faculty. While these factors were expected, our data revealed an increase in the number of faculty interlibrary loan returnable requests as well. This has created greater visibility for our department and continues to strengthen relationships between faculty and the UT Libraries. Adding the document delivery service has proven to be more effective at increasing our department's visibility and user participation than any previous marketing attempts.

  • The Future of IDS Project
    • Description forthcoming.

Thursday, 2:50pm - 3:40pm

  • Interviewing, Hiring, and Training Student Employees (Ben Hogben)
    • This presentation will give best-practices on interviewing, hiring and training Library student assistants. Also included is information on linking Library employment with learning outcomes. Information regarding work-performance and disciplinary concerns will also be covered. I am also presenting with CCC on Get It Now, so this presentation would need to be in a different time slot.

  • Adding and Modifying Document Request Forms (Jason Kibby & Chris White)
    • Recently, The College of Saint Rose and the Sage Colleges added and modified Document Request Forms to improve the experience of users and to expedite request processing. Modifying the Illiad pages included the addition of request forms for musical scores, audio-visual materials and ERIC documents and the elimination of pages for reports and conference papers. In the presentation, we would demonstrate the process of setting up new forms by showing how to create and tweak html forms and how to tweak Customization Manager settings to make the web forms operable.

  • Visualizing Library Data (Nicolle Colello, Jennifer Murray)
    • The University at Buffalo Libraries are using Tableau to analyze our Discovery and Delivery services* provided across the library. We have many discrete systems that provide data sets as well as numerous statistics kept by several staff using multiple tools. This approach has been data rich but information poor. Decision making and value reporting is difficult in that it lacks the ability to bring together these data elements in a centralized, informative and easily accessible method. With Tableau, it allows us to blend and leverage data collected from many different sources, offers the flexibility to efficiently explore and comprehend large quantities of data, and allows us to collaborate with other University at Buffalo departments including the Office of Institutional Analysis. This session will focus on our analytics initiatives with Tableau in an attempt to interpret data in a way that allows us to make informed decisions that: • Drive improvements of library services • Create workflow efficiencies • Aid in direction of future library services • Demonstrate the impact and value of library services *Our Discovery and Delivery services include: Circulation (loans, returns, renewals), Delivery+ (https://library.buffalo.edu/delivery/), Inter-library loans, Document Delivery)

  • Administration Roundtables
    • Description forthcoming.

Thursday, 4:30pm - 5:20pm

  • Yes, I Use Get It Now. Should You? (Karen Melanson, Ben Hogben, Anne Bouvier)
    • Since its commercial launch in April 2011, CCC's award-winning Get It Now service has been adopted by over 300 institutions of all types and sizes. Some institutions use it to augment ILL borrowing when they need an article quickly or if other sources can't meet their needs. Others use it once they exceed the rule of 5, while still others offer it to patrons as a round the clock alternative when the ILL office is closed. There are dozens of reasons to use Get It Now, could this mean that there is a good reason for you to use it? Get It Now provides academic library patrons with immediate fulfillment of unsubscribed journal articles 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Available in a librarian-mediated workflow, an OpenURL link resolver-based unmediated workflow, or a hybrid of both workflows, Get It Now offers millions of journal articles from over 130 leading publishers virtually expanding your library collection to the delight of library patrons. In this session, Karen Melanson of CCC will give a brief overview of the workflows, features, and benefits of Get It Now so session attendees have a foundational knowledge of the service. Ben Hogben of Ithaca College and Anne Bouvier of SUNY Buffalo will then share why they chose to adopt Get It Now along with their experiences using it, including benefits derived, challenges faced, and future plans. We will then open the discussion up to the audience for questions and suggestions.

  • ILLiad Addons Discussion Group (Bill Jones & Logan Rath)
    • Description forthcoming.

  • GIST GDM Online (Mark Sullivan)
    • The Gift & Deselection Manager Online (GDM) will manage and streamline a single library’s workflow for processing gifts and evaluating materials for weeding while aiding in coordinated collection development, last copy detection, and resource sharing. By linking gift processing, conspectus analysis, and deselection among all the IDS libraries, GDM Online would achieve a high level of interconnectedness. This system would also allow for enhanced acquisitions through usage data from ILLiad systems, book lists, and circulation statistics. Weeding of collections, on a consortial scale with GDM Online, would provide for a simple way to determine if one library’s discards would fit another library’s subject area. Last Copy could be easily determined and would prevent the loss of a unique item from IDS libraries.

  • Learn more about recent EBSCO Discovery updates and Plum Analytics' new data visualization component
    (Nancy Grimaldi and Jim Kropelin)
    • Come join Nancy Grimaldi and Jim Kropelin to learn more about these two resources. Maximize the Value and Usefulness of Your Collection EBSCO Discovery ServiceTM brings together the most comprehensive collection of content—including superior indexing from top subject indexes, high-end full text and the entire library collection—all within an unparalleled full-featured, customizable discovery layer experience. Plum™ Analytics. PlumX is an impact dashboard that provides information on how research output is being utilized, interacted with, and talked about around the world. It delivers a more complete picture of research and answers questions about research impact by gathering metrics from the places people interact with research artifacts such as articles, clinical trials, blog posts, grants, books, theses/dissertations, webpages and more. These metrics are then categorized into Usage, Captures, Mentions, Social Media and Citations.

Friday, July 31st, 2015

Friday, 10:00am - 10:50am

  • Using ILL Data and Statistics: The Power to Help You Rule Your ILL World
    (Tony Melvyn, Erin Duncan)
    • "Data will set you free." Ford Motor Company CEO Alan Mullaly coined this now-familiar phrase back in 2007. Interlibrary loan (ILL) and resource-sharing systems track everything from call numbers to turn-around time, so we have the opportunity to build and adjust our ILL workflows through a data-driven approach. In this practical session, Tony Melvyn, Product Manager for OCLC Delivery Services, will discuss key interlibrary loan data and statistics that you can track within your library using OCLC ILL statistics and assessment tools. He will show you how to use this data to understand and improve your ILL service. He will also walk you through the reports you can review to inform simple adjustments to lender strings or broad changes in collection development strategies, such as implementing demand-driven acquisition, that improve library services. At the end of the session, Tony will invite you to share your experiences of how you've already used data and statistics to inform decisions in your libraries. He will also lead a conversation about what future data, reports and tools would help you make more informed decisions about your library and continuously improve your library's ILL and other services. This session will include: • An overview of the key interlibrary loan data and statistics available • An introduction to the OCLC ILL Assessment tools • An opportunity to share your thoughts on what data and statistics are important to you and what types of reports would enable you to make more informed library decisions

  • Lightning Talks (New Staff Development)
    • Description forthcoming.

  • ILL as a Resource and How a Pilot Project Changed an Access Services Department
    (Marta Ambroziak, Sarah Hughes, Marie Ascher)
    • Objectives Historically, New York Medical College's Health Sciences Library has charged patrons for ILLs. The library developed a pilot project to explore the feasibility of removing the $3 fee by evaluating the budgetary impact. Eliminating the cost to patrons, should result in an increased use with greater patron satisfaction. Methods ILLs were made free over a six month period. The number of borrowing and document delivery requests, journal titles requested and topic areas were captured. Turnaround times were evaluated to see if the desired 24-72 hour time frame was met. Cost out report was developed to view the budgetary impact of ILL. Three years of previous data was compared. Patron satisfaction was assessed. Finally, a Collection Development committee considered the use of free ILLs as a way to ease the decision of eliminating journal subscriptions. Results During the project, ILL borrowing requests significantly increased. Our cost out report demonstrated the cost to the library to provide ILL service. Survey results showed that users find interlibrary loans critical for research and teaching. This redefined ILL from a service to a resource. The cost of an ILL is similar to the cost of a single use of ScienceDirect database. An unexpected result was the impact on the functions of the Access Services department, which lead to workflow retraining and restructuring of the department. Conclusions Providing free ILLs was measured and assessed in terms of both monetary and non-monetary values. The library will need to explore new ways of providing ILLs to meet budgetary constraints. The project further led to redefine ILL service in general. An expanded ILL service will positively impact user needs and demonstrate the value of having trained staff to provide high quality service.

Friday, 11:00am - 11:50am

  • "Disrupting" ILL Services In a Good Way (Beth Posner, Silvia Cho, Phillip Mui)
    • "Disruptive technologies" is a buzzword regularly found in the mainstream media. It describes - often hyperbolically - ground-breaking developments that disturb the way things are, creating new ways to engage with the world. In libraries and the field of interlibrary loan, there have certainly been many technologies that have enabled reinventions. Though they may seem “old school” now, OCLC cooperative cataloging, ALA forms, computers, scanners, Ariel, ILLiad, even library resource sharing, itself, were all disruptive technologies in their time. Equally important are disruptive ideas, which are activist stances inviting us not to accept the present as it is, but to imagine an alternative paradigm that leads to real improvements and benefits in the world. In this presentation, we will consider current disruptive technologies and ideas â€"such as rethinking ILL policies to allow longer loan periods or the lending of reference material; the sharing of e-books and DRM; the Open Access movement that is challenging the status quo of scholarly communication; shared collections management and print repositories, and ways to re-imagine how libraries can meet ever more prohibitive prices for licensed information. We want this to be a forum for IDS members to collectively think about our role in the larger conversation about library information sharing and how we can help shape the future of information access for our communities.

  • IDS Logic: Development Update (Bill Jones & Mike Mulligan)
    • Description forthcoming.

  • Stumped? Let's Jump!: Getting Over Tricky Borrowing Requests (Sarah Shank)
    • Do you find yourself stumped by tricky Borrowing requests? Do you sometimes wonder where to find things outside of OCLC? Come discover some tips & tricks for jumping over those stumpers. Have some tricks of your own you'd like to share? Bring them along and we'll share them the last 15-20 minutes of the session.

Friday, 12:00pm - 12:50pm

  • ILL: The Uber Patron - Best Practices for Increasing Interdepartmental Problem Solving (Cen Cheng, Denise Forro)
    • The core function of interlibrary loan (ILL) is to provide patrons with resources beyond the boundaries of the library collection. In the process, ILL makes use of the library collection extensively in many ways: checking availability of requested titles, retrieving books from stacks and articles from electronic resources. Oftentimes, ILL will be the first one to find or be alerted to problematic situations such as missing books, damaged items, broken links, or incorrect catalog records. The larger the volume of ILL transactions, the more likely ILL is to encounter issues with general library resources and services. This is the reason why ILL can be considered as the uber patron for the library. Michigan State University's ILL department processes over 100,000 requests annually and constantly runs into a variety of library problems and mysteries. In the pursuit of being an efficient steward of library collections and being an effective responder to patrons' needs, the ILL department at MSU has developed a number of procedures to facilitate fast communication and problem resolution across units. During the presentation, typical problems and workflow adjustments will be shared with the audience, as well as some unexpected organizational changes following the recognition of the unit's efforts.

  • IDS Logic: Help Us Help You (Bill Jones & Mike Mulligan)
    • Description forthcoming.

  • Interlibrary Loan Assessment (Jennifer Acker)
    • All departments in the library were tasked with doing an assessment. This presentation will go through how we prepared and carried out this task.


Any questions? Please email Bill Jones at thebilljones@idsproject.org
or Mark Sullivan at director@idsproject.org